Microbiology of seawater

Microbiology of seawater

Microbiology of seawater

  • The world’s oceans cover some 70 per cent of the Earth’s surface and have a salt content of 3.5 percent.
  • The depth to which light can penetrate varies, but is limited to the first 100 meters.
  • Compared to freshwater habitats, marine ecosystems show much less variability in both temperature and pH.
  • A main issue in marine environments is that of pressure  this increases progressively in deeper waters, and at 1000 meters reaches around 100 times normal atmospheric pressure.
  • Increase in pressure is a decrease in temperature and nutrients.
  • However, certain members of the Archaea have been isolated even from these extreme conditions.
  • In contrast to terrestrial ecosystems, where plants are responsible for most of the energy fixation via photosynthesis, marine primary production is largely microbial,by the help of members of the phytoplankton.

zones of seawater

  • Protozoans and fungi that feed on the phytoplankton.
  • Because of the high salt concentration of seawater, the bacteria that are typically found in such environments differ from those in freshwater.
  • In the last decade or so, the presence of ultra microbacteria has been detected in marine ecosystems at relatively high densities; these are around one-tenth of the size of ‘normal’ bacteria.
  • Marine bacteria are of halophilic.
  • Anaerobic decomposing bacteria inhabit the benthic zone, carrying out reactions similar to those that occur in freshwater
    sediments.
  • The profundal zone is largely free of microbial life.

Microbiology of seawater

ALSO READ: Microbiology of freshwater

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